Episode 9: Pushing Upstream | PleasureTown

Episode 9: Pushing Upstream | PleasureTown.


Let’s talk Podcasts.


I’m a huge fan of NPR, and WBEZ is my local affiliate. As part of their ever-expanding media empire, WBEZ is hosting a number of really fantastic podcasts that cover everything from news and music, food and foodie culture and stories. Oh the stories! Right now, my favorite has to be Pleasuretown. Full disclosure: Some of my favorite people in the world have contributed to (or run) Pleasuretown.

Set in a fictional town at the turn of the 20th century, Pleasuretown is a collaborative storytelling podcast where people can learn about a town that’s entire purpose is the pursuit of pleasure. We know that bad things have happened to residents of our town, but we don’t know what. Each story reveals a little bit more of what happened and why it happened.

It’s innovative, clever and 100% free. Give it a listen–and start with this one. Episode 9 has a story by one of the most creative (and kind) minds I’ve ever known: Will Hindmarch. This is the best jumping on point for one hell of a ride.


How To Stay Safe During The Egg Recalls : Shots – Health News Blog : NPR

Would it help to buy organic or cage-free eggs?

Ive never seen data to suggest that those chickens are less apt to be salmonella-infected. They might be because, basically, theyre farmed the way they used to be in the old days — when farms had smaller flocks. Here, you have these gigantic egg-laying factories. And you can see that there are many opportunities for much wider contamination of the eggs.

via How To Stay Safe During The Egg Recalls : Shots – Health News Blog : NPR.

Back in the old days, Hens weren’t forced into pens that were far too small for them.  Nor were they forced, by the location of said pens, to eat their own feces.

Break’s Over

I was listening to Morning Edition this morning when they played a story on HumanLight. For those too lazy to click on links, HumanLight is a Humanist (secular) winter festival that celebrates reason, hope and compassion. It is an attempt to include agnostics, atheists and humanists into the “holiday season.”

I hate this season, and I am constantly looking for new traditions to replace the ones I’ve lost since my parents passed away. So I listened to this report and found myself saying, “hell yeah, this could totally be it!” when I heard the song from the story. It was Tom Waits meets Ellis Paul singing seventh grader poetry. I found my interest in the festival waning.

I like the idea of a non-religious festival celebrating humanistic ideals. I do not like the idea of soppy poetry with gruff lyrics. My favorite Christmas Song, Fairytale of New York, is not your typical “holiday song” but it has more meaning to me than Silent Night.

So while I search for replacement traditions, fill me in on your own: When do you open presents? What kind of presents do you give and receive? How does your family celebrate this season?